IMPORTANT!!

We are keeping a close eye on the "Heartbleed" bug you may have heard about. The vendor we use for Online Banking has completed a preliminary assessment and has not discovered any vulnerability. We will be sure to keep you updated should anything to the contrary be discovered. Rest assured that we are doing everything we can to help ensure that your information is safe.

It is always a good practice to use unique passwords for all of the online services you access. If your GCF Online Banking password has also been used with a different service, we do recommend that you change your Online Banking password at this time.





If you currently utilize GCF’s online banking EXPRESS TRANSFER function to make your loan payments, this service will be temporarily unavailable from April 25, 2014 through June 9, 2014. As an alternative to this temporary inconvenience, you can do one of the following:

  • Contact 1-877-589-6600 ext. 320 or 368 between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, to manually complete the transaction.
  • Mail a check to Investors Bank, 101 Wood Avenue South, Iselin, NJ 08830.
  • Sign up for GCF’s online bill payment system and set up a monthly payment to be sent to Investors Bank.


Fast Access




GCF Bank is now part of the Investors Bank family!

Tuesday, July 16, 2013

Edition #721


Today's Highlights:

Past issues of GCFlash:

July 9, 2013 Edition #720

July 2, 2013 Edition #719

June 25, 2013 Edition #718

June 18, 2013 Edition #717


Weekly Spotlight:

Looking for small business resources? Try a few of the sites listed here.


Our Current Rates:

For a listing of our current deposit and loan rates, click here.

Today's National Market Rates
July 16, 2013 6 Mo Ago
01/15/12
1 Yr Ago
07/16/12
5 Yrs Ago
07/16/08
Dow Jones Industrial Average
(Up 2,604.49 or 15.42% since 12/31/12)
15,451.85 (-0.21%) 13,534.89 12,727.21 11,239.28
S&P 500
(Up 250.07 or 17.53% since 12/31/12)
1,676.26 (-0.37%) 1,472.34 1,353.64 1,245.36
NASDAQ
(Up 578.99 or 19.17% since 12/31/12)
3,598.50 (-0.25%) 3,110.78 2,896.94 2,284.85
10 Year Treasury Bond Yield 2.53% 1.83% 1.46% 3.93%
British Sterling 1.5154 1.6106 1.5573 2.0015
Euro 1.3161 1.3369 1.2248 1.5938

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1st Flash

Congratulations Mom and Pop!

For years, regular readers have heard me lament the demise of mom and pop stores. Once a fixture of every shopping district, their doors were shuttered once the shopping malls and big box stores overtook the landscape.

Smaller businesses just couldn't compete. I'm not talking small business by government definition. I mean the sole proprietors and LLCs of the world. Those entrepreneurs who saw a need and filled the void.

They lived the American dream. They learned a trade and provided a service to the community. They climbed the ladder of success back when it wasn't considered a bad thing to be successful. They were the upwardly mobile generation who believed hard work reaped large rewards.

The economic advantage held by chain stores caused their numbers to decline. Those that occupied the shopping malls and outlying big box stores had the benefit of purchasing in bulk. They pay a fraction of what the lone outsider does for the exact same product.

Strike one for the sole proprietor who serves a smaller market.

Free shipping is awarded to those who order above a dollar level set by the supplier. Strike two for the sole proprietor who never reaches that level, and pays shipping costs on top of higher product cost.

Chain stores have multiple outlets, one conveniently located near wherever else you may happen to shop. They can offer interest-free credit card terms if you apply for their branded store card. Strikes three and four for the little guy with one location and barely scraping by.

Yet even with one extra strike, they're still not out.

The independent business is making a comeback. Consumers are finally learning that what you gain in quantity, you lose in quality.

First is the quality of the product itself. It's common for a large retailer to ask manufacturers to bid for the privilege of selling their product.

For instance, Home Depot may solicit bids from various lawnmower vendors. Which one of you can provide a product for less than a given amount? They'll each go to their drawing board and put out respective bids for every component that goes into their equipment.

The manufacturer who submits the lowest price will setup a dedicated area of their plant to produce nothing but Home Depot equipment using the bargain components they acquired. Another section of their facility builds nearly identical equipment for their supplier distribution, using the standard components.

This is why you may have seen John Deere mowers in their store last year, but MTD this year. Next year it may be Cub Cadet or Toro.

It's also why you can have a markedly different quality of performance when you buy the identical model of a given product from a dealer rather than a large chain outlet.

The little guy is usually pretty knowledgeable about the items he sells. He can set them up properly before you even leave the store, answer any questions you may have, service the product as need be, and even get you replacement parts.

And the American public is catching on. They're returning to the local business folks in droves.

Consumers face a choice. In this cash-strapped, fragile economy, are you better served to buy a cheap disposable product or one that is dependable but costs a little more?

More and more people are choosing quality. With it comes the service offered by your local business folks.

They have survived despite the many strikes against them. Well done, mom and pop.


On The World Wide Web

All business people have to start somewhere. But where? There's a For Dummies for that. Find it here.

You'll always run into something you hadn't before when you run a business. The Internet can get you up to speed. But with 10 gazillion websites, where do you start? Point your browser to this site.

Start, run and grow your business with a Toolkit from BizFilings.com.

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2nd Flash

It's All In Your Head

What's the difference between a successful entrepreneur and a business failure?

It's all in your head. You must fail a time or two before you become successful. Those that go on to achieve don't accept failure as an option. They see it as a lesson learned and put that knowledge towards their next venture.

What makes a successful business model?

It's all in your head. What worked for one organization may not for another. Those that succeed have a vision undetected by others. If you know your product and see a previously untraveled path to promote it, take that path.

Howard Johnson did. And on top of producing the country's best ice cream, created the idea of franchising.

Johnson had no time for extracurricular activities. He woke, walked, breathed, slept and dreamt of ways to run a business. It was all in his head.

Born in 1897 during the Industrial Revolution, technology played a large role in his accomplishments. Left in debt after his father died, Johnson turned his focus to finding new ways to do business.

He went further into debt by spending $500 to buy a drugstore with a soda fountain near his Quincy, Massachusetts home. The soda fountain only sold three flavors of ice cream. And they didn't taste very good.

Johnson used a hand-cranked ice cream freezer to experiment with new recipes. It didn't take long for him to recognize that the best flavors came from using only natural ingredients. Word quickly spread that Johnson's shop had delicious ice cream.

Customers drove for miles to buy his product. Now he stumbled on epiphany number two. America would one day become a car nation.

He began to expand but never strayed from serving a quality product. He developed a concept where independent operators could benefit from the brand he created. They would operate under his name. Johnson would provide food, supplies, the logo and the building design.

The first franchise was launched. His brand grew rapidly.

Home Depot has a successful business model that allows them to offer product without putting their money up first. They supply the shelving, manufacturers pay to lease the space. A manufacturers representative will visit the store on an assigned basis to conduct inventory, replenish items that sold and tidy up the display.

The latest trend in business is peer-to-peer industries. Brought to you by various apps and social media outlets, anybody can sell tidbits or offer advice to anybody who may need the same.

Can't find a parking spot? ParkingPanda allows anyone to reserve parking in a private space someone else has made available from any computer or smartphone. Or skip the driving all together with SideCar. Hitch a ride from someone heading your way and never have to hail a cab again.

Skip the restaurant, too. SupperKing allows you to sell seats at your dinner table to anyone wanting to check out home cooking rather than menu fare. It's an iPhone app that works the same way Airbnb does in the hotel industry.

Success is all in your head. Dream it, build it, promote it. Unlock your potential. You'll find the key in your head.


Tip of the Week

In this extreme heat, know the symptoms of heat exhaustion. If you or somebody you know experiences heavy seating, fatigue, dizziness, confusion, nausea, clammy, moist skin, pale complexion, muscle cramps or elevated body temperature, they need to be treated to avoid heat stroke. Have them rest in a cool, shaded or air conditioned area. Drink plenty of water or other non-alcoholic beverages. Take a cool shower but avoid extreme temperature changes.


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Quotable

"I think luck is the sense to recognize an opportunity and the ability to take advantage of it. Everyone has bad breaks, but everyone also has opportunities. The man who can smile at his breaks and grab his chances gets on." - Samuel Goldwyn


Today in History

1790 - Congress establishes District of Columbia as our nation's capital.


Flash Fact

The District of Columbia does not have voting representation in the U.S. Congress. A 1978 proposed constitutional amendemnt to grant the District those rights died in 1985 when it couldn't get the necessary 28 states to approve it.

Have a comment about something you read in GCFlash? Suggestions for future articles? Drop us an email!

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PURPOSE:

GCFlash is a weekly e-mail sent only to its listed customers and associates free of charge. GCFlash informs customers of special product offerings which may be of interest, current interest rates on both deposit and loan products, selected financial news and other financial tidbits. GCFlash is intended to supplement the more comprehensive information listed on the GCF Web site at http://www.gcfbank.com.

GCFLASH PRIVACY STATEMENT

For a copy of our Privacy Policy, visit www.gcfbank.com/gcflash_privacy.aspx

GCF maintains your e-mail address in a confidential and secure database along with much of your other account information, such as mailing address and telephone number, etc. Before aggregating our e-mailing list each week, we filter out any duplicates. In most cases, this inhibits the unintended e-mailing of multiple copies of GCFlash to a single e-mail address. However, because these account records are kept by both individual and account, there is a chance members of the same household could each receive a copy of GCFlash or any other transmission at the same e- mail address - resulting in multiple copies. For example, a husband and wife that both have accounts with GCF may both receive a copy because the names are different but listed at the same e-mail address. This is similar to the manner in which each individual may share a common telephone number. To handle this situation, GCF recommends you simply delete any extra copies of GCFlash as this will ensure that ALL individuals receive any future promotional mailings, which might only be targeted or offered to specific accountholders meeting certain criteria. GCF has the capability to suppress customer e-mail addresses so they are omitted from our transmission list. If you would rather have a specific household member's e-mail address suppressed in our electronic database, simply send us a reply, as stated below, and indicate the accountholder for which you would like to have e-mail suppressed. Please keep in mind that this suppression will mean that NO future e-mails are sent, including special promotional offers. If you have any questions about this process or need additional information, please contact us at netaccess@gcfbank.com.

If you would like to be removed from this electronic mailing list, click this link to send us an email to unsubscribe. Please note, removing your name from our electronic mailing list means GCF will send NO FUTURE NEWS or SPECIAL OFFERS.


GCF Bank
381 Egg Harbor Road
Sewell, NJ 08080
(856) 589-6600
www.gcfbank.com